Imagine the billions of webpages to be searched when a keyword is typed into the searchbox and the answer comes on your screen within a matter of minutes? In organic search, you don’t have to continually pay to be seen, and once you’ve reached the first page of Google (and you have quality content and a trustworthy site), you’ll often stick there for a long period of time (depending on the amount of competition). SEO (Search Engine Optimization) is arguably the most commonly used method for increasing the flow of traffic through a site. Providing your audience with something that does not expire after a short period, something that never loses its value.

Education is the best legacy when it comes to SEM

Google cares deeply about the indexed age of both your site and its content. A brand new site that's a newcomer to Google is going to have a far harder time ranking on its SERPs than a site that has indexed age. Google scores ‘fresh content’ that’s updated regularly in a different way to a news article that doesn’t change. Remember the last time you wanted to find a place to eat or solve a problem at home? Never underestimate the power and growing importance of Social Media channels. The shares you get on Facebook, Twitter or G+ add great value to your backlink strategy.

Better Rankings for Minor Keywords

A little keyword research can go a long way in helping you understand what your audience wants. One of my firm beliefs is that Google is becoming more and more ‘human,’ and should be treated that way. This means that in all your SEO efforts, you should consider the use for us human visitors first, and then check if that aligns with any SEO recommendations. Use social media networks to promote other people’s content as well as your own. People generally know if you’ve taken action on social sites to help them, and if they see that you’ve helped them, the chances of them helping you out in return are much higher. The more higher quality, relevant websites pointing at your site, the better chances of moving up Google’s ranking ladder.

Understanding comment spam

It’s a fact that longer load times mean higher bounce rates and a significantly worse user experience. Many studies conclusively show that longer loading times can lead to significantly lower sales and search engines take the loading times of websites or blogs very seriously. Be aware of long-tail keywords, which are usually three to four words in length. The longer the keyword, the more specific it is. That means lower competition and, often, higher conversion rates by nature. In order to get the most success with search engines, you need to speak their language. They don’t care how pretty your site is or how much blood, sweat, and tears went into creating it. Sad but true. However, they do care about the keywords you use on your web pages so make sure you use them properly. Weave them throughout the text in a natural way and use variations just to cover the entire basis. Gaz Hall, an SEO Expert from the UK, said: "The more likely potential visitors are to think your site will provide an answer to their search query, the more traffic a page will gain."

This story about onsite SEO will haunt you forever

Why are links so important? Firstly, links are the connecting paths of the internet, the primary way to move from one site to another. Secondly, a link from one site to another acts as a citation – evidence that the target site is useful or interesting in some way. Search engines view these citations as a sign of authority. Duplicative or unnecessary website content can also hold you back from your true ranking potential. Search engine optimization is a set of best practices that cater to both Google’s algorithm and the user experience. The ranking factors that play into Google algorithm have various weights and importance, and the algorithm constantly changes. Links on your page maybe internal—pointing to other pages on your site—or external—leading to content on other sites. In either of these cases, the better your anchor text is, the easier it is for users to navigate and for Google to understand what the page you're linking to is about.